Saddened by the Disrespect Shown to Another Young Soldier (Repost 5/26/17)

uncle-terry-recent

After recently visiting my Uncle’s grave, I was upset to hear, once again, about another young man who lost his precious life.

Another son had died.

In a foreign, far away place.

He fell as a soldier wearing the United States uniform, and now, his parents were bringing him home.

And the reactions of the plane’s passengers made me sick.

VERY SICK and VERY ANGRY!

The article describing the incident here.  

I wanted to cry. I felt horrified to think other human beings could be so calloused. Americans, at that!

I couldn’t even fathom this lack of respect, nor comprehend such a show of self-centeredness or whatever they thought they were trying to achieve.

What causes a person/people to treat a grieving family with such disdain?

What has happened to our America?

I tried to place myself in that family’s shoes; that frozen moment in time they will NEVER forget…

My heart was heavy for them.

But how can my heart be SO different from those that were on that plane?


My family is also familiar with this pain. They could tell you of profound grief.

We, too, lost a young soldier in Vietnam many years ago.

Terry3

He was escorted home, finally.

It just happened to be decades after being listed as Missing in Action. (MIA)


It was the 60s and the Vietnam War was raging. My Uncle Terry had volunteered just as his two older brothers had.

Marine family of uncles, dad, and brother

He was part of a helicopter crew, rescuing the wounded when his helicopter was shot down.

Some of the men were thrown from the fiery crash, but Terry was never found.

We always wondered what the full story was.

Terry5

Then, in 1993, some Vietnamese farmers came forth with items from a crash. And the story began to unfold.

Forensics were then confirmed in Honolulu, and my brother–then a young Marine himself– escorted Terry’s remains home.

Terry could’ve been buried at Arlington. However,  the family thought it best to teach a community (and the younger generations) a valuable lesson.

A lesson we feared was being lost, not really taught in schools much anymore.

Not just one lesson, but many:

That war was cruel.

Kids were still dying to this day.

That we should be there to support families, help where needed, and invite a military family over for the holidays.

(You know, just be a good human.)

That this could have been anyone’s son or daughter.

And there were other countries losing their people, DAILY, due to lack of freedom with many picking up rifles to enter war as children.

Most importantly,

that freedom had a price. Always has, always will.

A HUGE price.


So, on that hot and humid July 4th, Terry’s high school gym was packed out.

He was remembered for his talented football skills, and his kind, gentle ways.

Terry1

His ultimate sacrifice recognized.

Our family, once again, was left with distant memories.  Terry’s parents (my grandparents) had wounds reopened all over again.

Terry4

People lined the streets, kids waved flags, and many a biker rode in from the surrounding states to finally return their MIA bracelets.

It was a memorable sight to see them piled high, on the floor, near my grandparents’ feet. It had to be so hard for them.

The news crews were there to capture it all.

The flag-draped coffin.

The thunderous flyover that moved you to your core.

The caisson; a solemn reminder as it passed through town to the beat of a sole drum.

COMPLETE RESPECT was shown that day.

Tragically, for this other family on the plane…

that didn’t happen.

There wasn’t much, if any, shown.


My Uncle Terry didn’t get to finish college.

Terry 2

And I sometimes wonder what his life might have looked like.

What would’ve been his hobby to tinker with?

Who would he have married? How many kids would he have?

He wasn’t able to marry, have kids or enjoy a weekend with family.

(Just to have another day to show his own thankfulness.)

No, he CHOSE to leave a comfortable life to help in a far away land.

He wanted to show his loyalty.

He wanted to make sure we were ALL afforded continued freedom.

Simply put…HIS MOTIVES were PURE.

USMC, Marine soldier's gravestone


If I had been on that plane, I can tell you…

I could NOT have sat there silently!

I KNOW, that I would’ve stood to speak for that family.

I KNOW, I would’ve cried with that family.

I KNOW, I would’ve tried to apologize to that family.

AND, I would’ve thanked them and made it clear that this is not the totality of America that my Uncle, nor their son, gave their lives for!!


Find a military family to reach out to.

Reach out to a grieving widow, a cop, a neighbor…the lonely and under appreciated in your community.

Compliment your local worker.

Invite someone over for the holidays.

Say a prayer for others.

Just show some kindness, some thankfulness.

Bridge the gap(s).

Teach your kids.

Show some honor and respect.

I know my Uncle Terry would have,

if he could.


* For Terry’s documented military story two accounts are listed below:

http://www.vhpa.org/KIA/incident/68081999KIA.HTM

❤️🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸❤️🇺🇸

http://www.hmm-262combatvets.org/hoffmann_memorial.htm


Link to:The United States Marine Corps

Written in honor of Terry who would have turned 72 Feb. 4th.💗

Show some thankfulness this Thanksgivingposter.

We Honor Our Veterans

My Parents Married 55 Years Ago

The Wrong Place at the Right Time

My Dad entered the Marine Corps as a young kid from a small town in Indiana.

dad at bootcamp

Boot camp was in California.

He was one of three brothers who went into the Marine Corps.

Hoffmans

On leave, one weekend, he and some other Marines went looking for a church service and ended up in the wrong church.

Wrong, because he was looking for The Church of God based out of Anderson, Indiana, and the church he visited that day was a totally different denomination, The Church of God out of Cleveland.

Now, you may not think that is a big deal, but those two denominations are WORLDS APART and you would quickly know upon entering the doors.

A person might even be a little overwhelmed by it all; especially, back in the 1960s.

dad

But, Dad saw a cute girl singing in the choir and ended up coming back. 😉

My Grandma then felt sorry for the young Marines (so far from home) and invited them over for lunch after church.

And, the story unfolds….

mom and dad 1960 revisedmom and dad revised

Two Kids Got Married

They were married April 13, on a Friday.

They’ve always joked about it being Friday the 13th….the reference being bad luck. (for all my overseas friends/blog followers. 🙂 )

Mom wasn’t even finished with high school yet.

parent's wdding8

Mom’s brother Donnie was the best man and her sister Mary, the Maid of honor.

parent's wdding6

parent's wdding2

Mom’s colors were turquoise with yellow accents. And dad wore a sharp, white tux he had made, to perfect proportions, in Okinawa. (Interestingly, where my brother is now deployed as a Colonel with the Marine Corps.)

Dad said he had been paneling the reception area the day before the wedding. 🙂

parent's wdding5

parent's wdding3parent's wdding4

And another little tidbit Mom has always shared…her organ player got upset about being put behind some drapes and ruined the music on this day. HA

parent's wdding7

parent's wdding1

Then they headed back to Indiana where my Mom met her in-laws. She would always relay the story of how she was so nervous; a timid, young girl meeting an entire family at the airport for the first time, and on her honeymoon none the less!

parent's wddingc

parent's wddingd

parent's wddinge

Life Moves On

Dad was still in the Corps and Mom was now pregnant with me, the first child. She was carrying me while Dad was on board ship during the Cuban Crisis. Mom said she was so worried as she watched the news and heard talk of America possibly going to war with Russia. It was a very serious threat at the time.

Later, Dad returned to do some construction work and then became a policeman. He attended college, at night, majoring in criminal justice to earn an AA degree.

1

Mom would go back to finish her GED and then become a stay at home mom. Later on, she attended night classes for secretarial work where she worked for a temporary agency from time to time. (I remember her taking notes, in shorthand, during church. Does anyone remember that? I always thought it looked so cool!)

Later, in 1966, my little brother would be born (the Col) and we would move back to Indiana in 1974 where dad had been raised. (He being the outdoorsman from a small town…yeah, he was SO OVER California by then.)

me w parents young

me with parents youngus kids with dad young

4mom and dad recent

There’s so much more to the story….

To be continued..

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY to MOM AND DAD!

Saddened by the Disrespect Shown to Another, Young Soldier

uncle-terry-recent

After recently visiting my Uncle’s grave, I was upset to hear, once again, about another young man who lost his precious life.

Another son had died.

In a foreign, far away place.

He fell as a soldier wearing the United States uniform, and now, his parents were bringing him home.

And the reactions of the plane’s passengers made me sick.

VERY SICK and VERY ANGRY!

The article describing the incident here.  

I wanted to cry. I felt horrified to think other human beings could be so calloused. Americans, at that!

I couldn’t even fathom this lack of respect, nor comprehend such a show of self-centeredness or whatever they thought they were trying to achieve.

What causes a person/people to treat a grieving family with such disdain?

What has happened to our America?

I tried to place myself in that family’s shoes; that frozen moment in time they will NEVER forget…

My heart was heavy for them.

But how can my heart be SO different from those that were on that plane?


My family is also familiar with this pain. They could tell you of profound grief.

We, too, lost a young soldier in Vietnam many years ago.

vietnam-wall

He was escorted home, finally.

It just happened to be decades after being listed as Missing in Action. (MIA)


It was the 60s and the Vietnam War was raging. My Uncle Terry had volunteered just as his two older brothers had.

Marine family of uncles, dad, and brother

He was part of a helicopter crew, rescuing the wounded when his helicopter was shot down.

Some of the men were thrown from the fiery crash, but Terry was never found.

We always wondered what the full story was.

terry

Then, in 1993, some Vietnamese farmers came forth with items from a crash. And the story began to unfold.

Forensics were then confirmed in Honolulu, and my brother–then a young Marine himself– escorted Terry’s remains home.

Terry could’ve been buried at Arlington. However,  the family thought it best to teach a community (and the younger generations) a valuable lesson.

A lesson we feared was being lost, not really taught in schools much anymore.

Teach about the cost of freedom flag poster.

Not just one lesson, but many:

That war was cruel.

Kids were still dying to this day.

That we should be there to support families, help where needed, invite a military family over for the holidays.

(You know, just be a good human.)

That this could have been anyone’s son or daughter.

And there were other countries losing their people, DAILY, due to lack of freedom.  Many picking up rifles to enter war as children.

Most importantly,

that freedom had a price. Always has, always will.

A HUGE price.


So, on that hot and humid July 4th, Terry’s high school gym was packed out.

He was remembered for his talented football skills, and his kind, gentle ways.

terry-in-high-school

His ultimate sacrifice recognized.

Our family, once again, was left with distant memories.  Terry’s parents (my grandparents) had wounds reopened all over again.

hoffman-kids

People lined the streets, kids waved flags, and many a biker rode in from the surrounding states to finally return their MIA bracelets.

It was a memorable sight to see them piled high, on the floor, near my grandparents’ feet. It had to be so hard for them.

The news crews were there to capture it all.

The flag-draped coffin.

The thunderous flyover that moved you to your core.

The caisson; a solemn reminder as it passed through town to the beat of a sole drum.

COMPLETE RESPECT was shown that day.

Tragically, for this other family on the plane…

that didn’t happen.

There wasn’t much, if any, shown.


My Uncle Terry didn’t get to finish college.

hoffman-kids-older

And I sometimes wonder what his life might have looked like.

What would’ve been his hobby to tinker with?

Who would he have married? How many kids would he have?

He wasn’t able to marry, have kids or enjoy a weekend with family.

(Just to have another day to show his own thankfulness.)

No, he CHOSE to leave a comfortable life to help in a far away land.

He wanted to show his loyalty.

He wanted to make sure we were ALL afforded continued freedom.

Simply put…HIS MOTIVES were PURE.

USMC, Marine soldier's gravestone


If I had been on that plane, I can tell you…

I could NOT have sat there silently!

I KNOW that I would’ve stood to speak for that family.

I KNOW, I would’ve cried with that family.

I KNOW I would’ve tried to apologize to that family.

AND, I would’ve thanked them and made it clear that this is not the totality of America, that my Uncle, nor their son, gave their lives for!!


Find a military family to reach out to.

Reach out to a grieving widow, a cop, a neighbor…your community.

Invite someone over for the holidays. Say a prayer for others.

Show some thankfulness.

Bridge the gap(s).

Teach your kids.

Show honor and respect.

I know my Uncle Terry would have,

if he could.

Written in honor of Terry who would have turned 72 on Feb. 4th.

Show some thankfulness this Thanksgiving poster.



For Terry’s military documented story:

http://www.vhpa.org/KIA/incident/68081999KIA.HTM

United States Marine Corps

 

 

Mission BBQ Restaurant Speaks Patriotism

Mission BBQ Restaurant Speaks Patriotism

We seem to eat a lot of BBQ where we live.

We. love. it.

AND, we are very picky about our BBQ, so I was both curious, and a little apprehensive about it.

We hadn’t heard of this particular restaurant; then again, we hadn’t been to the Patuxent River, MD, area in years.

Outside the restaurant, there was a nice patio area with picnic bench style seating.

Mission BBQ Restaurant

I really wasn’t expecting the interior to look the way it did, but Mission BBQ screamed absolute patriotism from the minute we walked in!

Mission BBQ Restaurant

I guess that’s to be expected being right across the street from the Patuxent Naval Air Station, not sure about the other locations.

NEVER have I seen so much, military paraphernalia, under one roof, aside from military museums.

I had a hard time eating as I didn’t know where to look first..it was all so interesting.

img_5969

I wanted to take it all in and look at everything.

Every square inch had something interesting to read or look at.

Mission BBQ

This was at our booth.

Missions BBQ plaque in honor of Sgt. Paul Fisher KIA

There were interesting articles, captivating pictures, even clever ways of displaying items; including, recognizing our community heroes like police, firemen, etc.

Missions BBQ honoring community

I love ANY PLACE that pays tribute to our great men and women of the military as well as those who support our community. [Hence my previous article  referring to my military family.]


You can choose a variety of smoked meats placed on or off the bun, lean or fatter cuts.

You then have a seat and wait for it to come out.

I chose the leaner beef brisket, (just the meat) while

the hubs had the brisket sandwich with fries as his side.

My side was the mac-n-cheese…IT WAS DELISH!

Probably the best/creamiest/cheesiest macaroni I’ve EVER had at a restaurant, for real.

(And I’m very picky about my mac-n-cheese!) 🙂

My meal also came with a piece of cornbread. I guess I missed that part when ordering.

The brisket had that Texas, oak, smoked flavor like you cooked it around the campfire.

Mission BBQ menu is here: http://mission-bbq.com/menu

They even have a gluten-free menu.

How did I miss getting a picture of our food, though! 😦

So, here’s some images for you: FOOD and SAUCES


Our history was on the walls, the tables and booths.

And of course, I had to find the Marine Corps emblem imbedded among several branches on our table.

Marine Corps insignia in the table at Mission BBQ

Even the cardboard caddy holding the six, different, choices of sauce, recognized the MIA and POWs.

Some of my favs were the KC Classic, and the more vinegar based Carolina.

Mission BBQ Sauces

They had a blend of spices and speciality sauces, up by the drink station, too, that I found to be so yummy.

Mission BBQ and recognizing POW MIA

Did you know National POW/MIA  is recognized on the third Friday of every September?

I guess I had forgotten when that was. My own Uncle Terry had been MIA for decades. (I hope to share that story, soon.)

Terry A. Hoffman MIA 1968 USMC


Coming back from the men’s restroom, my husband said, “You should see what’s in the guys’ room.”. He told me the walls were plastered with 1940 pin-up girls

not surprised there,

but then mentioned that the Farrah Fawcett’s poster was hanging above the men’s urinal.

Once again, NOT surprised.

For you young kids…it’s ICONIC.

That poster probably hung in just about every, young, teenage boy’s room across America!

Including my husband’s. (It was the only poster he ever had.) 🙂

So, naturally I wanted to see what was in us gals’ restroom.

I was trying to guess,

I thought, TOP GUN images FOR SURE!

As I rounded the corner looking for my restroom, guess whose face was peering down at me?

Tom Cruise in Top Gun fighter plane

Yep, Tom Cruise in the cockpit of a fighter jet.

We actually had jets flying overhead as we walked into the restaurant. I just love the sound of those things.

Later on, I noticed a few pilots had walked in.

They’re unmistakable aren’t they?

Once inside my restroom…

But of course…I should’ve guessed.

Lots women sending their lovers off to war with a kiss. Also infamous poses.

women sending their men off to war with kisses

 I was trying to imagine what they must’ve been feeling when those pictures were snapped.


The manager at Mission BBQ was going around visiting with people, and I noticed how he greeted patrons like they were family. I overheard him sharing about the restaurants and other cities where they have locations.

So, I’d recommend it. It’s a fun and interesting place with great food to boot.

Mission BBQ Restaurant

I was glad to see homage paid to all our military, and community service workers,

for once,

so for that fact alone, I would eat there.

Do you have a Mission BBQ near you or a favorite BBQ restaurant you like to visit?